PC Hillary Clinton Higher Ed Proposals FINAL

Hillary Clinton’s New College “Reforms”

Seemingly, nothing now stands between Hillary Clinton and the Democratic nomination, so it’s worth looking anew at her proposals regarding higher education. Back in May, Professor Gary Wolfram critiqued the ideas Clinton had been pushing, but recently she advanced some new proposals that go beyond her earlier ones. During her primary fight with Senator Bernie … Continue reading “Hillary Clinton’s New College “Reforms””


Jack Montague FINAL

Two Key Lawsuits Lead Counterattack Against Title IX Overreach

Hyper-aggressive federal officials have taken the vague language in Title IX of the 1972 Education Act Amendments and treated it as if it gave them plenary authority to control anything on a college campus having in any way to do with sexual misbehavior. The wording says: “No person in the United States shall, on the … Continue reading “Two Key Lawsuits Lead Counterattack Against Title IX Overreach”


The Private Student Lending Industry’s Death Has Been Greatly Exaggerated

Mark Twain’s famous quip about the rumors of his demise applies to the private higher education lending industry. Many people think that because Congress did away with the nominally private Federal Family Education Loan Program in 2010 and the Education Department’s Federal Direct Loan Program has been mushrooming, the private lending business must be dead, … Continue reading “The Private Student Lending Industry’s Death Has Been Greatly Exaggerated”


Should Employers Be Prohibited from Asking Applicants About College Credentials?

Court decisions can have unintended consequences just as statutes or regulations can. The Supreme Court’s 1971 decision in Griggs v. Duke Power has had a huge impact on higher education, giving the “college for everyone” movement a great but unanticipated boost.  The problem is that the lack of a college degree now operates against people … Continue reading “Should Employers Be Prohibited from Asking Applicants About College Credentials?”


Does “Merit Aid” Make Sense?

Businesses sometimes charge different customers different prices as a way to maximize revenue. Airlines, for example, usually charge more for seats reserved on short notice, on the theory that the traveler probably doesn’t have good alternatives and will therefore pay a high price. (Economists call it price discrimination.) Similarly, colleges and universities sometimes also charge … Continue reading “Does “Merit Aid” Make Sense?”


Shocking: The Chronicle Supports the Case Against College for All

The May 6 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education contains two illuminating and rather unexpected articles: “Should Everyone Go to College?” by Scott Carlson and “When Everyone Goes to College: a Lesson from South Korea” by Karin Fischer. What makes these pieces so interesting is that they say clearly what so many in the higher education community have long been at pains to deny, namely that a country can go overboard on higher education.